Like the difference between spreading butter and jelly, is painting in oils now for me rather than acrylics. Now, mind you I refer to the butter that’s been sitting out on a summer day, all soft and shiny. I painted in the jelly of acrylics for several years and was afraid of oils with what seemed a complicated and dangerous occupation with the combustible and fume laden liquids.

I found a rosemary stand oil that says it’s safer to use but boy is it strong smelling. I keep it in a tightly sealed container. I use it to clean my brushes and to mix in the paint as needed remembering to paint fat over lean which is not too difficult of a rule to remember but it does take longer to dry so I have learned to use less. There’s a screen in the bottom and under there where I can’t see must be the stuff I scrub off the bristles and on the top is the pure oil which separates and rises like oil does.

So I am about painting over many of my old acrylic paintings – using the themes I once worked hours to develop and adding to it. That’s how this sheep got lost in my painting (above).

I’ve been painting in oils and wanted to do some portraiture practice. This 1893 painting made this famous painter – famous! I didn’t do her exactly carbon copy. But I did practice doing the initial sketch with the oil paints instead of pencil in a (new for me) blocking in technique. Then I went about paintings shapes and darks and lights. Anyhow I like this painting. It is a limited palette in lemon yellow alizarin crimson cadmium red ivory black ultramarine blue and titanium white. I love how these colors blended. I couldn’t see well enough to make out the Japanese letters on the wallpaper so I just looked up some a b c’s and that’s basically what it is. I plan to try more portraits. Next I plan to try another famous painter TBD.

Added some oil paint

In studying artists on youtube I found that many like to use oil paints on their acrylic paintings to brighten up and give more dimension. So I researched to find that no one says you cannot do it. Of course you cannot apply acrylic on an oil painted surface but applying oil in acrylic is a very common practice. It is possible to first cover the canvas with an acrylic painting, then add oil paint to portions of the canvas, the whole entire surface or just tiny details. Here it is so far.